Miércoles, 20 Noviembre 2019 07:48

In pursuit of the mechanisms that explain anxiety

A University of Cordoba researcher analyzed how metacognitive beliefs and emotional dysregulation determine symptoms of Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD)

A University of Cordoba research group combined algae and bacteria in order to produce biohydrogen, fuel of the future

Publicado en Nature science

A scientific article analyses the results yielded by GPS collars in ecological studies on wildlife by combining data from 167 projects worldwide

Publicado en Nature science

A University of Cordoba research team, for the first time, applied a protein identification technique to this product on a massive scale and found activity of healthy compounds

Publicado en Biomedicine and health

A University of Cordoba research group classified a gene family responsible for partial control of strawberry defense mechanisms when attacked by common pathogens in crop fields

Publicado en Nature science

A research group at the University of Cordoba published 14 years of weather monitoring in the Sierra Nevada along with photographs of snow distribution

Publicado en Nature science

The SustainFARM project seeks to augment the agronomic, environmental and economic performance of Integrated Food and Non-food Production Systems (IFNS)

Publicado en Nature science

University of Cordoba research analyzes how changes in the structure of soil microbiota affect holm oak decline

Publicado en Nature science

The Department of Forest Engineering at the University of Cordoba used LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) technology to plan Aleppo pine replanting in search of the highest absorption of carbon

The current importance of climate change has turned carbon sequestration into the focus of strategies aimed at reducing the concentration of CO2 in the atomosphere. Given their role as sinks for natural carbon, forest ecosystems can be allies in environmental sustainability. However, the challenge in research lies in increasing the “sequestration power” of these ecosystems.

Publicado en Nature science

The University of Cordoba, in collaboration with the University of Granada, participated in an international study published today in the journal Nature Ecology and Evolution, proving that Neanderthals were replaced by modern humans in southern Iberia 5,000 years before than previously thought

A study carried out in Bajondillo Cave (in the town of Torremolinos, in the province of Malaga) by an international team made up of researchers from Spain, Japan and the U.K. revealed that modern humans replaced Neanderthals 44,000 years ago. This study, published today in the journal Nature Ecology and Evolution and in which University of Cordoba and University of Granada scientists participated, demonstrates that replacing Neanderthals for modern humans in southern Iberia is an early, not late, occurrence, in the context of Western Europe. That is to say it happened 5,000 years before previously thought up until now.

Publicado en Humanities
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