Information For Authors

Scope of the Journal

Revista Española de Filosofía Medieval (REFIME) is a yearly scholarly publication indexed, peer-reviewed, and distributed by UCO Press. Regularly published since 1993, it is the official journal of Sociedad de Filosofía Medieval (SOFIME). Its official venue is the University of Córdoba (Spain).

The main scope of Revista Española de Filosofía Medieval is the broad field of studies on medieval thought. Its specific aim is to provide scholarship with outstanding scientific contributions, specifically on scientific and philosophical reflections developed through the Middle Ages, their sources, and their influence through the Renaissance and Early Modern periods. Any original contribution to study on the four main medieval traditions – Latin, Arabic, Hebrew, and Greek – is welcome, especially if focused on the transmission of knowledge among these different frameworks. While the main interest of the Journal is the philosophical analysis of doctrinal positions held by medieval and Early Modern thinkers, papers examining the historical context of those positions are welcome as well, recognising the implicit link between historical and philosophical study of medieval thought. The Journal is also interested in original papers on the broad history of scientific reflection, from Late Antiquity to the Early Modern period, especially when linked to their medieval development or sources.

Dedicated sections of the Journal publish critical reviews of newly published books and scientific notes of short length. In exceptional cases, the Journal accepts modern translations of medieval and Early Modern texts of short length accompanied by an introduction. Translations should be prepared bearing in mind their twofold aim of divulgation and scholarly contribution: the Editorial Board will only accept submission of papers meeting both of these requirements.

Articles submitted must be original contributions. Please note that the Journal will accept a limited number of contributions by the same author. The editors will decide on a case-by-case basis whether to consider further contributions by the same author in a short period. Similar consideration may apply to book reviews.

Authors should be aware that Revista Española de Filosofía Medieval will hold the copyright of the published articles. Consequently, articles published in the Journal must not be published again, either entirely or partially, in any other publications without explicit authorization by the Journal Editorial Board.

 

Journal Indexes

Revista Española de Filosofía Medieval is rated by Scopus, Sistema de Valoración Integrada de Revistas Españolas (RESH), Difusión y Calidad Editorial de las Revistas Españolas de Humanidades y Ciencias Sociales y Jurídicas (DICE) and LATINDEX. The Journal is indexed in Philosopher’s Index (PHI), ISOC – Ciencias Sociales y Humanidades, Répertoire Bibliographique de la Philosophie (RBPH), Regesta Imperii, Dialnet and EBSCO. Revista Española de Filosofía Medieval is published with the financial support of Sociedad de Filosofía Medieval (SOFIME), and is printed and distributed in open access by UCO Press.

 

Ethical and Legal Conditions

The Journal expects authors to observe the highest standards in publication ethics concerning plagiarism, misappropriation of others’ work, etc. As the Journal’s policy is to publish new, original work, and to respect the copyright of other publishers, authors are asked not to submit articles which have already been published elsewhere. Cases with exceptional circumstances will, however, be considered. By the same token, as the Journal holds the copyright of articles published with it, authors are reminded not to republish articles in other publications without explicit authorization by the Journal Editorial Board.

Submitted papers will undergo a process of blind peer review, evaluating the author’s contribution to the field and the authenticity of the proposed data. Authors are expected to contribute meaningfully with their paper to scholarly debate on the selected topic. Authors are also asked to provide any corrections/changes to the submitted paper as soon as possible after the review. The Editorial Board will ensure an objective peer review process, avoiding possible conflicts of interest. The Journal will treat articles in the review process with strict confidentiality.

The Journal editors assume complete responsibility and authority to reject or accept an article. The editors will confirm that they have no conflict of interest with respect to articles they accept/reject; and they will only accept a paper when they are reasonably certain of its authenticity. If errors are found, the editors will ensure publication of a correction or retraction, preserving the anonymity of reviewers.

Publishing ethics will be monitored and safeguarded by the Journal’s Editorial Board on the basis of guidelines for retracting articles, and maintenance of the integrity of the Journal’s academic standing. The Journal will always be willing to publish corrections, clarifications, retractions and apologies when needed, on the basis that neither plagiarised nor fraudulent data will be published.

 

Editorial Process

Submission Requirements

Language

Articles submitted must be written in English, Spanish, or Portuguese. For Arabic transliteration, the rules of the DMG (Deutsche Morgenländische Gesellschaft/German Oriental Society) are recommended.

 

Quotations

Regarding translation of quotations, see Quotations below.

 

Maximum Length

Manuscripts must not exceed the maximum length established for each type of submission:

– Articles: 10,000 words (including footnotes, but not including the bibliography)

– Research Notes: 6,000 words

– Book Reviews: 1,500 words

– Review Articles: 5,000 words

– Reports of Conferences, Workshops, etc.: 1,500 words

 

Style

Please follow carefully the guidelines set out below. Manuscripts not strictly following the Journal guidelines may be excluded in the initial screening process.

 

Anonymization

Papers must be submitted anonymously in order to undergo the blind peer-review process. This includes removal of the author’s name from the document, and temporary replacement of any acknowledgements in the first footnote with “[ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS]”. Authors should avoid self-references in the manuscript text and footnotes which could identify them. Before submitting the manuscript, authors must anonymize the document’s metadata (file profile). Failure to do so may result in the Journal finding the paper submission inadmissible.

Mac: Tools > Protect Document > Privacy > Remove personal information form this file on save

Windows: Info > Inspect Document area > Check for Issues > Inspect Document > Document Properties and Personal Information > Remove All

Microsoft Word’s guidelines for anonymization of documents can be consulted at: https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/office/remove-hidden-data-and-personal-information-by-inspecting-documents-presentations-or-workbooks-356b7b5d-77af-44fe-a07f-9aa4d085966f

 

Manuscript Submission

Papers must be submitted through the Open Journal System platform of the Journal. Link: https://www.uco.es/ucopress/ojs/index.php/refime/index. No paper sent by e-mail will be accepted. After submitting the article, the author will receive an e-mail acknowledging receipt. In the first phase of the editorial process, the editors will evaluate the quality and interest of the submission in terms of the editorial scope of the Journal, and will assess its fulfilment of the stylistic requirements set out in these guidelines. An evaluation that these requirements have not been met will lead to exclusion of the manuscript, which will be communicated promptly to the author.

Authors experiencing difficulties with the platform, or wishing information regarding the editorial process, are invited to contact the editors by writing to: refime@uco.es.

Authors/editors and publishers wishing to submit for review a newly published book can send a printed copy to: Prof. Dr. Pedro Mantas-España, Facultad de Filosofía y Letras. Dpto. Ciencias Sociales y Humanidades, Plaza del Cardenal Salazar s/n. 14071 - Córdoba (Spain).

 

Peer-Review Process

Papers must be submitted anonymously in order to undergo the blind peer-review process, as described above. Two scholars among eminent experts in the field will review the manuscript. The reviewers will not be members of the Editorial Board, but may belong to the advisory board. The Journal editors will choose the referees in consideration of scientific merits and professional experience. Reviewers will submit a detailed report on the quality, interest, and potential impact of the manuscript, which will be carefully considered by the Editorial Board when assessing the manuscript submission. In the case of disagreement between the two reports, the manuscript will be submitted to a third referee.

Acceptance or refusal of the manuscript, as well as suggested or required modifications, will be promptly communicated to the author. Incorporation of required modifications into the manuscript is a condition of its final acceptance. If considered necessary by the Editorial Board, the new version of the manuscript will undergo a further peer-review process before a final decision is made on whether to accept it. Authors will be kept appraised throughout the editorial process.

 

Final Article Version and Proofs

Once the paper is accepted, the author must upload to the OJS platform the peer-reviewed and revised version of the manuscript. The Journal will send the author the article proofs, which must be corrected and returned within 25 days.

 

The Manuscript

In order to be considered by the Editorial Board, the manuscript MUST respect the following parameters.

 

Document File Format

The article must be in a .doc or .docx file. Files submitted in .odt, .pdf, .tex, or any file format other than .doc will not be accepted.

 

Layout and Text Format

The article must be written without any special layout other than standard plain text in the following format:

  • Margins (top, bottom, left, and right): 2.54

  • Layout Indent: 0

  • Layout Spacing: 0

  • Indentation of the first line: 0

  • Line spacing: 1.0

  • Font: Times New Roman

  • Font Size of main text: 12

  • Font Size of footnotes: 10

  • Font Size of large quotations: 12

  • Footnote numbers should be placed outside quotation marks and any punctuation immediately following the quotation marks: “quoted text.”1 or “quoted text”. 1

 

Title, Abstracts, and Keywords

Every article and note submitted to the Journal must include the following:

  • A title, in English and Spanish;

  • An abstract of up to 150 words, in English and Spanish; and

  • Five keywords, in English and Spanish.

The first language presented in the title, abstract and keywords should be the language of the manuscript. If the manuscript is written in Portuguese, the required secondary language will be English. Translations must be reliable and accurate. The Editorial Board encourages authors to have their manuscript reviewed by a native speaker before uploading it to the Open Journal System. Poor, improvised, or mistaken translations will not be accepted and will require resubmission of the manuscript.

 

Acknowledgements

Authors wishing to include acknowledgements should create a footnote marked by an asterisk rather than a number, set at the end of the article title, and with “[ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS]” as the sole text in the footnote. The text of the acknowledgements can be added after the peer-review process.

 

Headings

If headings are used, they must be in the same font and size as the body of the text. The following formats should be used:

Heading Level 1 (in bold, centred)

Heading Level 2 (in italics, bold, centred)

Heading Level 3 (underlined, not bold, at the left margin)

At all heading levels, before and after the heading, only one blank line should separate the heading from the text.

 

Bibliography

Submitted papers must include at the end a bibliography of the sources cited in the footnotes (sources not cited in the article must not be included). The bibliography should be divided in the following manner and order:

– Manuscripts

– Primary Sources

– Secondary Sources

Bibliography entries in the primary and secondary source sections should appear in alphabetical order by authors’ last name. The reference should be set out as in complete footnote first references (following the instructions below), with the difference that the last name appears before the first name, with a comma following the last name and a period/full stop after the first name (e.g., Soto Bruna, María Jesús.).

 

Quotations

The Journal uses the American style quotation marks (“...”). For quotations inside a quoted text enclosed by quotation marks, single quotes (‘…’) should be used, as follows: “and he said, ‘what a wonderful evening!’ And then he talked no more”.[1] Please note that any punctuation closing a quotation that is in the original source must precede the closing quotation mark (“quotation.”1). If the quotation ends before the closing punctuation of the original source, use an ellipsis without parentheses before the closing quotation mark (“quotation…”1 New sentence.); or, particularly in very short quotations, place closing punctuation outside the closing quotation mark (“quotation”.1). The footnote number follows the closing quotation marks and punctuation in the manner indicated in these examples.

 

Examples:

Aquinas said he was speaking of the “possible intellect”, whereas in making this same point Albert had referred to the “material intellect”.[2]

Why did Aquinas specify that he had used “the arguments of the philosophers themselves”?

Not content with making a strong rebuke, Aquinas issued a challenge: “If anyone … wishes to say anything in reply to what we have written, let him not speak in corners … but reply to this in writing, if he dares”! [In the original source the sentence has further clauses]

 

Long Quotations

Quotations longer than 4 lines must be separated from the main text as set out below. Quotations must be translated into the language of the article, with the original text provided in a footnote.

  • A blank line must be left both above and below the quotation;

  • Font 12 (as in the main text); and

  • Right indentation of 1.5 for the entire paragraph of the quotation.

 

Example:

(Main text) For instance, while discussing how light and matter are intertwined, Ibn Gabirol explains:

(Large quotation, translated) The same thing is true about light that is diffused in hyle. The reason is that the more hyle descends, it is drawn together and is made bodily, and its middle parts prevent its last parts from being penetrated completely by light... The same thing should be said about the light that is infused in matter. The reason is that the purer, clearer, and freer from matter it is, the more perfect and stronger it will be. Similarly, it is also true that the more it is mixed with the clearer part of matter, the more it will preserve its own species, and it is stronger and firmer than the light that is mixed with the thicker part of matter ... It will consequently be established that the change that occurs in the light diffused in matter is only because of matter, not because of the light in itself.[3]

(Main text) Nonetheless ...

 

Short Quotations

Quotations shorter than 4 lines should remain in the body of the text and signalled by quotation marks: “…”. The quoted text should not be in italics. When longer than 5 words, quotations must be translated into the language of the article, with the original text provided in a footnote.

A very short quotation (1 to 5 words) can be inserted into the main text using quotation marks (“…”). In this case, a modern translation is not required.

 

Text Comparison Tables

Tables setting out text excerpts for comparison in the original language do not have to be completed by a modern language translation. Significant features can be indicated by using underlining or italics.

 

Reference: Footnotes and Bibliography

References in footnotes should be full citations in the first instance; subsequent citations to the same source take an abbreviated form as shown below. Stylistically, we encourage authors to use the format “see/véase” instead of “cf./cfr.” in their footnotes.

Footnote numbers must be placed after the last punctuation mark of the sentence. If quotation marks are used, the footnote number will follow them. In every case, footnote numbers are the last element of the sentence.

The guidelines below must be followed for both footnote references and the bibliography. Failure to do so may result in the Journal finding the paper submission inadmissible.

 

Book (Monograph)

Footnote First Reference

Format

First Name and Surname, Title (Place of Publication: Publisher Name, Year), page numbers, if relevant. Please note that page numbers should not be preceded by “p.” or “pp.”, except in (rare) cases where their omission would cause confusion.

 

Examples:

Charles Burnett, The Introduction of Arabic Learning into England (London: The British Library, 1997).

Charles Burnett, The Introduction of Arabic Learning into England (London: The British Library, 1997), 32-37.

 

Further References

Format

Surname, Abbreviated Title, page numbers (if relevant).

 

Example

Burnett, Introduction of Arabic Learning, 20-27.

 

Ibidem or ibid. should never be used. If the reference directly follows a previous reference to the same work, use the format for further references.

 

Book Chapter

First Reference

Format

First Name and Surname, “Chapter Title”, in Title of the Volume, edited by First Name Initial and Surname of the editor/s (Place of Publication: Publisher Name, Year), page numbers. Please note that page numbers should not be preceded by “p.” or “pp.”, except in (rare) cases where their omission would cause confusion.

 

Please note the following:

  • If there is more than one author of the volume, use “and” to join the two names, adding a comma if their number is more than two (using the format “x, y, and z”).

  • To separate two or more places of publication or publishers, use “and” or the format “x, y, and z”, as shown below.

  • The names of the cities of publication should be in the language of the article, if such translated forms exist (e.g., in articles in English, Cologne, Rome).

  • Reference to a multiple-volume set should specify the total number of volumes right after the title, using Arabic numerals and “vols.” (e.g., 2 vols.). The volume cited should be specified after the publication information and before the page numbers, using a Roman numeral (see example below).

 

Examples:

Jean Jolivet, “The Arabic Inheritance”, in A History of Twelfth-Century Western Philosophy, edited by P. Dronke (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1988), 113-148.

Dag N. Hasse and Andreas Büttner, “Notes on Anonymous Twelfth-Century Translations of Philosophical Texts from Arabic into Latin on the Iberian Peninsula”, in The Arabic, Hebrew, and Latin Reception of Avicenna’s Physics and Cosmology, edited by D.N. Hasse and A. Bertolacci (Berlin and Boston: De Gruyter, 2018), 313-369.

Danielle Jacquart, “Le latin des sciences : quelques réflexions”, in Les historiens et le latin médiéval, edited by M. Goullet and M. Parisse (Paris: Vrin, 2001), 237-244.

María Jesús Soto Bruna, “El concepto de naturaleza como unidad causal en D. Gundissalinus”, in De Natura. La naturaleza en la Edad Media, 2 vols., edited by J. L. Fuertes Herreros and Á. Poncela González (Ribeirão: Húmus, 2015), I, 851-858.

 

Further References

Format

Surname, “Abbreviated Chapter Title”, relevant pages.

 

Examples:

Hasse and Büttner, “Notes on Anonymous Twelfth-Century Translations”.

Hasse and Büttner, “Notes on Anonymous Twelfth-Century Translations”, 314.

Ibidem or ibid. should never be used. If the reference directly follows a previous reference to the same work, use the format for further references.

 

Journal Articles

First Reference

Format

First Name Surname, “Article Title”, Title of the Journal Number/Issue (Year): article’s full page range. Please note that page numbers should not be preceded by “p.” or “pp.”, except in (rare) cases where their omission would cause confusion.

 

Please note the following

  • Arabic numerals should be used for journal volume numbers. Where all issues within a volume/year start on page 1 (without continuous pagination through the issues for that volume/year), please provide the issue number with the volume number as shown below.

 

Examples:

Jennifer M. Rampling, “John Dee and the Sciences: Early Modern Networks of Knowledge”, Studies in History and Philosophy of Science 43/3 (2012): 432-436.

Jennifer M. Rampling, “John Dee and the Sciences: Early Modern Networks of Knowledge”, Studies in History and Philosophy of Science 43/3 (2012): 432-436, 433.

 

Further References

Format

Surname, “Abbreviated Article Title”, reference to specific pages.

 

Examples:

Rampling, “John Dee and the Sciences”.

Rampling, “John Dee and the Sciences”, 434-435.

 

Ibidem or ibid. should never be used. If the reference directly follows a previous reference to the same work, use the format for further references.

 

Critical Editions and Translations

Because a critical edition can be published as a book, chapter of a volume, section of a monograph, or article, different reference formats are used depending on the means of publication. The following examples may be helpful.

 

Edition/Translation in a Book

Format for an Edition

Author, Title of the work, edited by Initials and Surname of the editor/s, Title of the published work where the critical edition is located if different from the author’s work (Place of Publication: Publisher Name, Year), pages if there is more than one work in the published volume, specific pages, lines (if required).

 

Format for a Translation

Author, Title of the work, translated by Initials and Surname of the translator/s, Title of the published work where the translation is located if different from the author’s work (Place of Publication: Publisher Name, Year), pages if there is more than one work in the published volume, specific pages.

 

Please note the following:

  • If the edition is part of an edition series, the title of the series and the related volume should be added to the entry (see the first and second examples below).

  • When a book contains more than one edition/translation, page references should be provided for the work cited.

  • If the edition is part of a collected volume, the editors of the volume must appear after its title, following the format for the reference to a chapter in a collected volume (see the third example below).

 

Examples:

Roger Bacon, Questiones supra libros octo physicorum Aristotelis, edited by R. Steele, Opera hactenus inedita XIII (Oxford: Clarendon, 1935).

Roger Bacon, Communia naturalium, edited by R. Steele, 3 vols., Opera hactenus inedita II-IV, II (Oxford: Clarendon, 1909).

Robert Grosseteste, De luce, edited by C. Panti, “Robert Grosseteste’s De luce. A Critical Edition”, in Robert Grosseteste and His Intellectual Milieu. New Editions and Studies, edited by J. Flood, J.R. Ginther, and J.W. Goering (Toronto: PIMS, 2013), 193-238, 197.

al-Ghazali, Tahāfut al-falāsifa, edited and translated by M.E. Marmura, The Incoherence of the Philosophers (Provo, UT: Brigham Young University Press, 2000).

Roger Bacon, Opus maius, translated by R. Belle Burke, 2 vols. (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1928), I, 345-355.

Avicenna, Liber de anima seu sextus de naturalibus, edited by S. Van Riet, 2 vols. (Louvain: Peeters, Leiden: Brill, 1972), II, 187,2-210,18.

Avicenna, De viribus cordis, edited by S. Van Riet, Liber de anima seu sextus de naturalibus, 2 vols. (Louvain: Peeters, Leiden: Brill, 1972), II, 187,10-19.

 

Edition/Translation in a Journal Article

Format

Author, Title of the work, edited by Initials and Surname of the editor, “Title of the Article” if different from the author’s work, Journal Title Issue/Number (Year): pages, specific pages.

 

Examples:

Gundissalinus, De anima, edited by J. T. Muckle, “The Treatise De anima of Dominicus Gundissalinus”, Mediaeval Studies 2 (1940): 23-103.

Roger Bacon, Lettre à Clément IV, translated by J.-M. Meillaud, “Philosophes médiévaux des XIIIe et XIVe”, Anthologie de textes philosophiques 10/18 (1986): 131-148, 147.

Roger Bacon, Summulae dialectices, edited by A. De Libera, “Les Summulae dialectices de Roger Bacon”, Archives d’Histoire Doctrinale et Littéraire du Moyen Âge 53 (1986): 139-289, and 54 (1987): 171-278, vol. 53, 140.

 

Further References

Format

Author, Title of the work, pages or pages and lines.

 

Examples:

Grosseteste, De luce, 234-235.

Grosseteste, De luce, 234,2.

 

Ibidem or ibid. should never be used. If the reference directly follows a previous reference to the same work, use the format for further references.

 

References to Page Lines

Format:

page,line. (no blank space)

page,line-line. (no blank spaces)

page,line-page,line. (no blank spaces)

 

Examples:

Grosseteste, De luce, 234,2.

Grosseteste, De luce, 234,2-4.

Grosseteste, De luce, 234,3-235,7.

 

Introduction to an Edition/Translation

Format:

Name, introduction/preface to Author, Title, edited by Initials and Surname of the editor, Title of the published work where the critical edition is located if different from the author’s work (Place of Publication: Publisher Name, Year), specific pages following the work’s numeration style.

 

Example:

Gerard Verbeke, introduction to Avicenna, Liber de anima seu sextus de naturalibus, edited by S. Van Riet, 2 vols. (Louvain: Peeters; Leiden: Brill, 1972), II, 7*-10*.

 

Further Aspects

For all other matters of style for references in English, the Chicago Manual of Style (available online at: chicagomanualofstyle.org/contents.html) should be used as a guide. Please pay attention to the capitalization rules: when referring to English titles, English capitalization rules MUST be observed.

The following words must always be capitalized:

  • Nouns

  • Adjectives

  • Verbs

  • Adverbs

  • Pronouns

  • Subordinating conjunctions (because, etc.)

The following words must never be capitalized (apart from when they are the first word in a title or follow a colon or full stop/period in a title):

  • Articles (the, a)

  • Coordinating Conjunctions (and, but, or, for, nor)

  • Prepositions with fewer than five letters (on, at, to, from)

These capitalization rules do not apply to titles in languages other than English. For titles in Latin and Romance languages, only the title’s first word and personal names are capitalised, as well as the first word of work titles included within the general title. Other languages, especially German, have their own grammatical rules for capitalization, which must be followed carefully.

Contracted references to ordinal numbers (5e, 5th, 12th) in any language admitting them must be superscript: 6th instead of 6th, 5e instead of 5e.

If a reference’s title contains within it another work’s title (in any language), that work’s title must be signalled through the reverse use of italics, if it is not separated by quotation marks (which must be transformed according to the present stylesheet).

 

Examples:

Paul Dutton, “The Little Matter of a Title: Philosophia Magistri Willelmi de Conchis”, in Guillaume de Conches: Philosophie et science au XIIe siècle, edited by B. Obrist and I. Caiazzo (Firenze: SISMEL, 2011), 467-486.

William R. Newman, The Summa Perfectionis of Pseudo-Geber. A Critical Edition, Translation and Study (Leiden: Brill, 1991).

Maria Pilar Ferrer Rodriguez, “Relación transcendental ‘materia-forma’ en el ‘Fons vitae’ de Ibn Gabirol”, Mediaevalia 5/6 (1994): 247-258.

 

–––––

[1] Example of the correct position of the footnote number in a sentence.

[2] Footnote to the two sources.

[3] (Footnote: reference to original text) Ibn Gabirol, Fons vitae, edited by C. Baeumker, Avencebrolis (Ibn Gebirol) Fons vitae ex arabico in latinum translatus ab Iohanne Hispano et Dominico Gundissalino (Münster: Aschendorff, 1895), 243,18-245,4: “Similiter et lumen quod est diffusivum in hyle; hoc est quia hyle, quo magis descenderit, constringitur et corporatur, et partes eius mediae prohibebunt ultimas partes perfecte penetrari lumine ... Similiter est dicendum de lumine quod est infusum in materia, hoc est quia, quo fuerit purius et clarius et liberius a materia, erit perfectius et fortius. Similiter etiam, quo magis fuerit commixtum clariori parti materiae, amplius servabit speciem suam, et est fortius et firmius quam illud quod est commixtum crassiori parti eius... Et secundum hanc considerationem debet ut diminutio luminis substantiarum et diversitas non sit propter lumen in se, sed propter materiam, quia est corporalis comparatione formae, sicut iam praedictum est.” Translated by J.A. Laumakis, The Font of Life (Milwaukee: Marquette University Press, 2014), 207.